A CORRELATION OF C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AND FEVER OF UNKNOWN ORIGIN

Dr. Venkata Tulasi Ramesh Potluri, Dr. Lakshmi Spandana Potluri

Abstract


INTRODUCTION: Fever without focus is termed when there is fever without localizing symptoms or signs, usually acute
in onset and persists for less than one week. It is more common in children less than 36 months of age. C reactive protein
level increases within hours of acute injury or onset of inflammation and reaches peak within 24 to 48 hours. CRP is
elevated in all bacterial infections in acute stages
MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective hospital based descriptive study conducted between June 2018 and July
2019 in a tertiary care centre in South India with 76 children under 3 months of age included in the study. Investigations
done predominantly included CBP with ESR & ANC, CRP, urine analysis, blood and urine cultures, chest radiograph.
RESULTS: CRP was a better indicator of serious bacterial infection (SBI) when compared to ESR and Leucocytosis when
various predictive indicators like sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value were
compared.
CONCLUSION: Semiquantitative CRP is useful in predicting occult serious bacterial infection (SBI) in children between
1 month to 36 months. CRP can also be considered a better predictive test than total white blood cell count and
erythrocyte sedimentation rate.


Keywords


Fever of unknown origin, CRP, ESR, Serious bacterial infection (SBI)

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