A STUDY TO ASSESS SELF-CONCEPT AND EFFECT OF LIFE SKILLS EDUCATION PROGRAMME ON KNOWLEDGE AMONG ADOLESCENTS OF A SELECTED SCHOOL IN KOLKATA

Ms. Manasi Ghoshal, Prof. Ratna Biswas, Mrs. Nirupama Roy

Abstract


A pre-experimental research study was conducted to assess the self-concept and effect of life skills education programme on knowledge among adolescents of a selected school in Kolkata. The study objectives were to assess self-concept and existing knowledge on life skills among selected adolescents and develop, validate a structured education programme on life skills and evaluate effect of that programme in terms of knowledge gain. . The conceptual framework was based on Stufflebeam’s CIPP evaluation model.

 

Methodology: Non probability purposive sampling technique was used to select 350 adolescents. Data were collected through self-concept questionnaire and structured knowledge questionnaire on life skills.

 

Result: The major findings of the study showed that most of the adolescents had above average self- concept level (78%). The mean, median of the post test knowledge score (14) were found to be higher than that of mean, median of pre-test knowledge score on life skills (7.33, 7) and the computed ‘t’ value (44.399) was found statistically significant at 0.001 level of significance, [df (349 )= 3.29 ]. The chi square test showed that there is statistically significant association with the Self-concept with the demographic variable Age, Gender, Type of Family, Religion, Fathers’ Occupation and Area of Living, Birth order but no association was found between self-concept and educational status of father and occupation of mother. The findings also showed that pre-test life skills knowledge was strongly associate with age, gender, type of family, area of living and birth order but no association with religion, parental educational status, and parental occupation. The self-concept and pre-test life skills knowledge was found strongly associated.

 

Conclusion: The study was concluded with few recommendations to replicate on different settings, population and can be implicated in the field of nursing education, nursing practice, nursing administration and nursing research.


Keywords


Self-concept, life skills, adolescents

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References


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